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Software Defined Data Center Made Simple – VMworld2015 By @Psilvas | @ThingsExpo #SDN

The fun and always interesting Paul Pindell, Sr. Solution Architect

The fun and always interesting Paul Pindell, Sr. Solution Architect, breaks down the #SDDC in clear and simple terms. He discusses the various elements such as software defined compute, software defined storage and software defined network along with management and how they combine to create a software defined data center. Each element can be abstracted and pooled to have a simplified, automated, orchestrated data center solution. He also talks about VMware’s Unified Hybrid Cloud and how F5 solutions help control access, provide security and allow organizations to deploy applications faster than ever.

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More Stories By Peter Silva

Peter is an F5 evangelist for security, IoT, mobile and core. His background in theatre brings the slightly theatrical and fairly technical together to cover training, writing, speaking, along with overall product evangelism for F5. He's also produced over 350 videos and recorded over 50 audio whitepapers. After working in Professional Theatre for 10 years, Peter decided to change careers. Starting out with a small VAR selling Netopia routers and the Instant Internet box, he soon became one of the first six Internet Specialists for AT&T managing customers on the original ATT WorldNet network.

Now having his Telco background he moved to Verio to focus on access, IP security along with web hosting. After losing a deal to Exodus Communications (now Savvis) for technical reasons, the customer still wanted Peter as their local SE contact so Exodus made him an offer he couldn’t refuse. As only the third person hired in the Midwest, he helped Exodus grow from an executive suite to two enormous datacenters in the Chicago land area working with such customers as Ticketmaster, Rolling Stone, uBid, Orbitz, Best Buy and others.

Writer, speaker and Video Host, he's also been in such plays as The Glass Menagerie, All’s Well That Ends Well, Cinderella and others.

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