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Networking in 2015 - SDN and IPv6 | Part 2 By @MJannery [#SDN]

Once the initial scares surrounding IPv4 address exhaustion passed, enterprises have taken a relaxed attitude to deploying IPv6

In Part 1, I shared my thoughts on SDN in 2015, after reading Sean Michael Kerner’s article in Enterprise Networking Planet.  This post will cover a few of my thoughts on IPv6.

Once the initial scares surrounding IPv4 address exhaustion passed, enterprises have taken a relaxed attitude to deploying IPv6 (if they deploy it at all).  Given that there are sufficient IPv4 addresses for enterprises to use internally and well proven solutions for implementing NAT at the LAN/WAN boundary, there doesn’t appear to be a compelling reason for enterprises to adopt IPv6 internally in 2015.  Furthermore, most network architects, operations and support teams are very familiar with designing, supporting and troubleshooting IPv4 networks they are less familiar with performing the same with IPv6 or mixed or tunnelled IPv4/IPv6 networks.

Has your organization adopted IPv6?  If not, are you planning to?  We’d welcome your thoughts and comments.

More Stories By Michael Jannery

Michael Jannery is CEO of Entuity. He is responsible for setting the overall corporate strategy, vision, and direction for the company. He brings more than 30 years of experience to Entuity with 25 years in executive management.

Prior to Entuity, he was Vice President of Marketing for Proficiency, where he established the company as the thought, technology, and market leader in a new product lifecycle management (PLM) sub-market. Earlier, Michael held VP of Marketing positions at Gradient Technologies, where he established them as a market leader in the Internet security sector, and Cayenne Software, a leader in the software and database modeling market. He began his career in engineering.

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