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by Tim Lieto

The tendency of most companies is to talk strategy and vision. Almost every technology company can paint a future that is somehow more elegant based on their product’s fit into customer plans. And, as a sales leader, if you find a company whose vision you find compelling enough to inspire you to share it with customers, you’re probably feeling pretty good about things.

But sales is ultimately measured on wins and losses. And there is no taking solace in a grand vision if you cannot meaningful and immediately make a difference in a customer’s life. So as much as sales is about demonstrating a better future, there is no substitute for solving immediate pain.

This means that the ideal landing spot for anyone in a sales role is a company that thinks big but is committed to enabling the game changing vision for today’s customer problem set.You want to be a part of an organization that wants to do nothing short of changing the world, but who has the focus to do it in ways that provide immediate tangible benefit.

I am certain I have found that in Plexxi.

Before joining Plexxi as the head of Worldwide Sales, I spent the last three years as a general partner of a consultancy called The WaveSense Group. Our business was predicated on being able to look at markets, pore over relevant data, and ultimately detect market waves before they hit. The work was broad in scope, challenging in execution, and rewarding in impact. But when you sit with clients and advise on market trends, sometimes you come across an opportunity so powerful that you have to get off the sidelines and into the game.

That moment came for me when longtime colleague and current Plexxi CEO Rich Napolitano shared with me what Plexxi was doing. The IT industry as a whole is poised for the kind of massive change that comes along once in a generation. The rise of technology waves like Big Data and mobility spell an imperative architectural shift that will disrupt all of IT. The companies that seize on this change will thrive.

But lofty promises about the future do not always solve immediate customer pain points.

The reality in IT is that the major technology pillars have all forged ahead while networking has muddled along at the back of the pack. Imagine you had been in a datacenter a decade ago and then went to some remote island. It’s your first day back in the datacenter. You walk in and survey your surroundings. The servers have all been virtualized. Storage has moved to clustered solutions with mixed storage types. But networking today is virtually indistinguishable from the way it used to be.

The point is that networking hasn’t gone through a structural change in more than two decades. Existing solutions are getting long in the tooth. They are fast approaching the end of their useful life. How do I know? The most advanced players like Google and Facebook have resorted to building their own infrastructure rather than buying from commercial vendors. But it’s not just them. Enterprises are building out parallel infrastructure to support newer generation scale-out applications.

The appetite for an alternative that actually solves the complexities of building and managing a network has never been larger. This widespread recognition of the inadequacies of today’s solutions creates a compelling impetus to move.

Having a vision for how IT will evolve is critically important in making sure you are building a company to last. But many companies have come and died because they had a great vision but no compelling reason to get there. Our industry—right here, right now—is going to make the move…provided that the companies to whom they migrate can solve real problems today.

Plexxi’s application of Third Platform principles along very specific current platform problem spaces spells out immediate opportunity and a long-term road to success. By focusing on making networking simply better, Plexxi is forging a path forward. Whether it’s within the agile datacenter, in support of scaled-out applications, or in delivering the distributed cloud, Plexxi is making simply better networks.

The post An industry in transition appeared first on Plexxi.

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