Welcome!

SDN Journal Authors: Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, TJ Randall

Related Topics: @DXWorldExpo, Java IoT, Microservices Expo, Linux Containers, SDN Journal

@DXWorldExpo: Article

Big Data – How We Got Here and Is It For Everyone? | @BigDataExpo

An organization needs to be data driven in order to understand the data’s value and lament its absence

Big Data is an umbrella term for a multitude of new capabilities that are being used for storage and computing operations at scale. These capabilities allow organizations to store massive amounts of data, in disparate formats, and perform both batch and real-time analyses upon them.

The forces driving Big Data into the mainstream are the ever-decreasing cost of storage and processing, coupled with the open source enhancements of distributed systems techniques and software. Companies have realized that data storage is on the verge of being limitless, and they no longer need to be as judicious about what kinds of data they store. This realization has led to the storage of all manner of data, in addition to the traditional structured data found in relational databases.

Sometimes unstructured or semi-structured, this type of data encompasses emails, social media feeds, clickstreams, sensor data, videos and more. Further, the questions companies can ask of their data to realize value have become more complex. But the time window for analysis completion has remained the same or shrunk due to the massively parallel computation Big Data systems provide.

To organize all this limitless data - structured and unstructured - new tools have emerged. We no longer have just one hammer in our toolkit - the relational database - with which to fashion data. There are now a myriad of systems, thanks to big organizations, many of them Internet giants (Google, Yahoo!, Amazon, Facebook, and LinkedIn to name a few). Out of a need to scale storage and compute tasks confronting them, they made new data systems to satisfy these specific use cases. The most common characteristics of these systems are that they are not row based or relational databases. The systems have horizontal linear scalability (just add more nodes), and they expect components and nodes to fail so they are fault tolerant.

Most of these tools have been open sourced and, years later, are being adopted by other businesses that recognize their value. Examples of these non-relational databases are key-value pair databases (e.g., Riak), document databases (e.g., CouchDB, MongoDB), columnar databases (e.g., HBase, Cassandra), graph databases (e.g., Titan, Neo4J), distributed queues (e.g., Kafka, Kestrel) and spatial databases. There are also new computing tools such as Hadoop and Spark that allow immense amounts of data to be processed, and Storm, Samza and Spark Streaming which analyze data in near real-time, something that was previously only possible with supercomputers.

The ability to store unlimited amounts of disparate data in order to perform endless analysis in batch and real time is the allure of Big Data. But is it for everyone?

Are you ready for the Big Data bandwagon?
The promise of Big Data is very real - more data + new ways to analyze data = better business intelligence. So every business should be rushing out to see what Big Data can do for them, right? Not so fast.

Although Big Data has the capability to provide unprecedented insight into business operations, it is not for everyone. At least not yet. Big Data tools are still immature enough, even eight years after we've started down this road, that companies really have to be highly motivated to take on the task.

In my experience, this motivation typically comes from pain. For example, it is the pain of dropping valuable data on the floor because long-term storage isn't feasible within the current infrastructure. Or possibly it's the pain of not being able to monetize collected data due to technical hurdles with existing data systems. This type of pain - and the knowledge that the only way to escape it is to embark on Big Data - provides the fortitude necessary to push through on what can be quite a challenging project. In fact, it was this kind of pain, as experienced by Internet giants who needed to find a way to store, analyze and, ultimately, monetize the massive amounts of customer data to which they had access, that birthed the Big Data movement in the first place.

In addition to being highly motivated to take on Big Data, an organization must also be data driven. Organizations that treat data as currency are better equipped to tackle the challenges of Big Data, because they inherently understand its value and will nurture the initiative, no matter how unruly it becomes. Without this level of buy-in from top-level management, the obstacles of Big Data may prove to be too large to overcome.

The combination of the pain of unexploited data with a data-driven culture goes hand in hand. You typically won't find one without the other. It is when these two factors come together that organizations can then successfully tackle the challenge of Big Data. Without the right motivation or executive support, Big Data endeavors often die before they even begin. Ultimately, an organization needs to be data driven in order to understand the data's value and lament its absence.

More Stories By Brad Anderson

As vice president of Big Data informatics, Brad Anderson is responsible for Liaison's Big Data solution implementation, leveraging the company's world-class cloud infrastructure. He is a 20-year data management veteran with expertise in enterprise data warehouses and building and using non-relational Big Data tools.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


CloudEXPO Stories
Nutanix has been named "Platinum Sponsor" of CloudEXPO | DevOpsSUMMIT | DXWorldEXPO New York, which will take place November 12-13, 2018 in New York City. Nutanix makes infrastructure invisible, elevating IT to focus on the applications and services that power their business. The Nutanix Enterprise Cloud Platform blends web-scale engineering and consumer-grade design to natively converge server, storage, virtualization and networking into a resilient, software-defined solution with rich machine intelligence.
Concerns about security, downtime and latency, budgets, and general unfamiliarity with cloud technologies continue to create hesitation for many organizations that truly need to be developing a cloud strategy. Hybrid cloud solutions are helping to elevate those concerns by enabling the combination or orchestration of two or more platforms, including on-premise infrastructure, private clouds and/or third-party, public cloud services. This gives organizations more comfort to begin their digital transformation without a complete overhaul of their existing infrastructure - serving as a sort of "missing link" for transition to cloud utilization.
Digital transformation is about embracing digital technologies into a company's culture to better connect with its customers, automate processes, create better tools, enter new markets, etc. Such a transformation requires continuous orchestration across teams and an environment based on open collaboration and daily experiments. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Alex Casalboni, Technical (Cloud) Evangelist at Cloud Academy, explored and discussed the most urgent unsolved challenges to achieve full cloud literacy in the enterprise world.
Wasabi is the hot cloud storage company delivering low-cost, fast, and reliable cloud storage. Wasabi is 80% cheaper and 6x faster than Amazon S3, with 100% data immutability protection and no data egress fees. Created by Carbonite co-founders and cloud storage pioneers David Friend and Jeff Flowers, Wasabi is on a mission to commoditize the storage industry. Wasabi is a privately held company based in Boston, MA. Follow and connect with Wasabi on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and the Wasabi blog.
Digital Transformation and Disruption, Amazon Style - What You Can Learn. Chris Kocher is a co-founder of Grey Heron, a management and strategic marketing consulting firm. He has 25+ years in both strategic and hands-on operating experience helping executives and investors build revenues and shareholder value. He has consulted with over 130 companies on innovating with new business models, product strategies and monetization. Chris has held management positions at HP and Symantec in addition to advisory roles at startups. He has worked extensively on monetization, SAAS, IoT, ecosystems, partnerships and accelerating growth in new business initiatives.