Welcome!

SDN Journal Authors: SmartBear Blog, ManageEngine IT Matters, Patrick MeLampy, Liz McMillan, Carl J. Levine

Blog Feed Post

Why Contextual Data Locality Matters

Big Data is quickly overtaking SDN as a key phrase in today’s networking lingo. And overused already as it may be, it actually has a lot more meaning and definition compared to SDN. Big Data solutions are designed to work on lots of data as the name suggests. Of course they have been around forever, talk to any large bank, credit card company, airline or logistics company and all of them have had applications running on extremely large databases and data sets forever. But this is the new Big Data, the one inspired by Hadoop, MapReduce and friends. High performance compute clusters specifically created to analyze large amounts of data and reduce it to a form and quantity that human brains can use in decision making.

What makes today’s Big Data solutions different than its more traditional large database based applications, beyond the sheer datasets being analyzed, is the distributed nature of the analysis. Big Data solutions are designed to run across 100s or even 1000s of servers, each with multiple CPU cores to chew on the data. Traditional large database applications tend to be more localized with fewer applications and servers accessing the data, allowing for more tightly custom integrated solutions, the likes of which Oracle and friends are experts at.

Big Data Flashback

In the late 80s I started my career working as a network engineer for a high energy physics research institute. Working closely with the folks at CERN in Geneva, these physicists were (at the time, and probably still) masters of creating very large datasets. Every time an experiment was run, Tbytes of data (probably Pbytes by now) were generated by thousands of sensors along the tunnel or ring particles were passed through to collide.

The Big Data solution at the time was primitive, but not all that much different than today. The large datasets were manually broken into manageable pieces, something that would fit on a tape or disk. These datasets were then hand copied onto a compute server or super computer and the analysis application would churn through it to find specific data, correlate events and simply reduce the data to something smaller and meaningful. This would then create a new dataset, which would be combined, chopped up again, and the process repeated itself until they arrived at data that was consumable for humans to create new theories from, or provide a piece of proof of an existing theory.

During that first job, the IT group spend an enormous amount of time moving data around. A lot of it manual: tapes and disks were constantly being copied onto the appropriate compute server. The data had to be local to have any chance of analyzing the data. Between tapes, local disks and the network, the local disks were the only storage with appropriate speed to have a hope of finalizing the data reductions. And even then it would not be unusual to have a rather powerful (for the time) Apollo workstation run for several weeks on a single data set.

Back to the here and now

Forward the clock to now. The above description is really not that different from how Hadoop MapReduce works. Start with a big data set, chop it into pieces, replicate the data, compute on the data close to physical locality of the data. Then send results to Reducers, combine the results, then perhaps repeat again to get to human interpretable results.

As fast as we believe the network is within 10GbE access ports, it is still commonly the most restrictive component in the compute, distributed storage and network trio. Compute power increments have far outpaced network speed increments and even memory speed increments. We have many more cycles available to compute, but have not been able to get the data into these CPUs with the same increments. As a result, storage solutions are becoming increasingly distributed, closer to the compute power that needs it.

It’s a natural thought to have the data close to where it needs to be processed, close enough that the effort of retrieving it does not impact the overall completion of the task that uses that data. If I am writing a research paper that takes several hours to complete, I do not mind having to wait a second here or there for the right web sites to load. I would mind if I had to get into my car and drive to the library to look something up, drive back home to work on my paper, and keep doing that. The relationship between time and effort to get data has to become negligible compared to the time and effort required to complete the task.

Locality and growth

This type of contextual locality is extremely hard to manage in a dynamic and growing environment. How do you make sure that the right data remains contextually close to where it is needed when servers and VMs may not be physically close? They may not be in the same rack for the same application or customer, they may not even be in the same pod or datacenter. Storage is relatively cheap, but replication for closeness can very quickly lead to a data distribution complexity that is unmanageable in environments where its not a single orchestrated big data solution.

To solve this problem you need help from your network. You need to be able to create locality on the fly. Things that are not physically close need to be made virtually close, but with the characteristics of physical locality. And in network terms these are of course measured in the usual staples of latency and bandwidth. This is when you want to articulate relationships between the data and the applications that need that data and create virtual closeness that resembles the physical. This may mean dedicated paths through multiple switches to avoid congestion that will dramatically impact latency. These same paths can provide direct physical connectivity through dynamically engineered optical paths between application and storage, or simply appropriate prioritization of traffic along these paths. Without having to worry explicitly where the application is or where the storage is.

Physics will always stand in the way of what we really want or need, but that does not mean we use that same physics with a bit of math to create solutions that manage the complexity of creating dynamic locality. Locality is important. More pronounced in Big Data solutions, but even at a smaller scale it is important within the context of the compute effort on that data.

[Today's fun fact: Lake Superior is the world's largest lake. With that kind of naming accuracy we would like to hire the person that named the lake as our VP of Naming and Terminology]

The post Why Contextual Data Locality Matters appeared first on Plexxi.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Michael Bushong

The best marketing efforts leverage deep technology understanding with a highly-approachable means of communicating. Plexxi's Vice President of Marketing Michael Bushong has acquired these skills having spent 12 years at Juniper Networks where he led product management, product strategy and product marketing organizations for Juniper's flagship operating system, Junos. Michael spent the last several years at Juniper leading their SDN efforts across both service provider and enterprise markets. Prior to Juniper, Michael spent time at database supplier Sybase, and ASIC design tool companies Synopsis and Magma Design Automation. Michael's undergraduate work at the University of California Berkeley in advanced fluid mechanics and heat transfer lend new meaning to the marketing phrase "This isn't rocket science."

@CloudExpo Stories
With the proliferation of both SQL and NoSQL databases, organizations can now target specific fit-for-purpose database tools for their different application needs regarding scalability, ease of use, ACID support, etc. Platform as a Service offerings make this even easier now, enabling developers to roll out their own database infrastructure in minutes with minimal management overhead. However, this same amount of flexibility also comes with the challenges of picking the right tool, on the right ...
“We're a global managed hosting provider. Our core customer set is a U.S.-based customer that is looking to go global,” explained Adam Rogers, Managing Director at ANEXIA, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 18th Cloud Expo, held June 7-9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
Security, data privacy, reliability and regulatory compliance are critical factors when evaluating whether to move business applications from in-house client hosted environments to a cloud platform. In her session at 18th Cloud Expo, Vandana Viswanathan, Associate Director at Cognizant, In this session, will provide an orientation to the five stages required to implement a cloud hosted solution validation strategy.
"We host and fully manage cloud data services, whether we store, the data, move the data, or run analytics on the data," stated Kamal Shannak, Senior Development Manager, Cloud Data Services, IBM, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 18th Cloud Expo, held June 7-9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.
China Unicom exhibit at the 19th International Cloud Expo, which took place at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA, in November 2016. China United Network Communications Group Co. Ltd ("China Unicom") was officially established in 2009 on the basis of the merger of former China Netcom and former China Unicom. China Unicom mainly operates a full range of telecommunications services including mobile broadband (GSM, WCDMA, LTE FDD, TD-LTE), fixed-line broadband, ICT, data communica...
Zerto exhibited at SYS-CON's 18th International Cloud Expo®, which took place at the Javits Center in New York City, NY, in June 2016. Zerto is committed to keeping enterprise and cloud IT running 24/7 by providing innovative, simple, reliable and scalable business continuity software solutions. Through the Zerto Cloud Continuity Platform™, organizations can seamlessly move and protect virtualized workloads between public, private and hybrid clouds. The company’s flagship product, Zerto Virtual...
As businesses adopt functionalities in cloud computing, it’s imperative that IT operations consistently ensure cloud systems work correctly – all of the time, and to their best capabilities. In his session at @BigDataExpo, Bernd Harzog, CEO and founder of OpsDataStore, will present an industry answer to the common question, “Are you running IT operations as efficiently and as cost effectively as you need to?” He will expound on the industry issues he frequently came up against as an analyst, and...
WebRTC is about the data channel as much as about video and audio conferencing. However, basically all commercial WebRTC applications have been built with a focus on audio and video. The handling of “data” has been limited to text chat and file download – all other data sharing seems to end with screensharing. What is holding back a more intensive use of peer-to-peer data? In her session at @ThingsExpo, Dr Silvia Pfeiffer, WebRTC Applications Team Lead at National ICT Australia, looked at differ...
With major technology companies and startups seriously embracing IoT strategies, now is the perfect time to attend @ThingsExpo 2016 in New York. Learn what is going on, contribute to the discussions, and ensure that your enterprise is as "IoT-Ready" as it can be! Internet of @ThingsExpo, taking place June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, New York, is co-located with 20th Cloud Expo and will feature technical sessions from a rock star conference faculty and the leading industry p...
IoT offers a value of almost $4 trillion to the manufacturing industry through platforms that can improve margins, optimize operations & drive high performance work teams. By using IoT technologies as a foundation, manufacturing customers are integrating worker safety with manufacturing systems, driving deep collaboration and utilizing analytics to exponentially increased per-unit margins. However, as Benoit Lheureux, the VP for Research at Gartner points out, “IoT project implementers often un...
SYS-CON Events announced today that Technologic Systems Inc., an embedded systems solutions company, will exhibit at SYS-CON's @ThingsExpo, which will take place on June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. Technologic Systems is an embedded systems company with headquarters in Fountain Hills, Arizona. They have been in business for 32 years, helping more than 8,000 OEM customers and building over a hundred COTS products that have never been discontinued. Technologic Systems’ pr...
SYS-CON Events announced today that IoT Now has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 20th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 6–8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. IoT Now explores the evolving opportunities and challenges facing CSPs, and it passes on some lessons learned from those who have taken the first steps in next-gen IoT services.
SYS-CON Events announced today that WineSOFT will exhibit at SYS-CON's 20th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. Based in Seoul and Irvine, WineSOFT is an innovative software house focusing on internet infrastructure solutions. The venture started as a bootstrap start-up in 2010 by focusing on making the internet faster and more powerful. WineSOFT’s knowledge is based on the expertise of TCP/IP, VPN, SSL, peer-to-peer, mob...
Containers have changed the mind of IT in DevOps. They enable developers to work with dev, test, stage and production environments identically. Containers provide the right abstraction for microservices and many cloud platforms have integrated them into deployment pipelines. DevOps and containers together help companies achieve their business goals faster and more effectively. In his session at DevOps Summit, Ruslan Synytsky, CEO and Co-founder of Jelastic, reviewed the current landscape of Dev...
SYS-CON Events announced today that delaPlex will exhibit at SYS-CON's @CloudExpo, which will take place on June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. delaPlex pioneered Software Development as a Service (SDaaS), which provides scalable resources to build, test, and deploy software. It’s a fast and more reliable way to develop a new product or expand your in-house team.
The security needs of IoT environments require a strong, proven approach to maintain security, trust and privacy in their ecosystem. Assurance and protection of device identity, secure data encryption and authentication are the key security challenges organizations are trying to address when integrating IoT devices. This holds true for IoT applications in a wide range of industries, for example, healthcare, consumer devices, and manufacturing. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Lancen LaChance, vic...
With billions of sensors deployed worldwide, the amount of machine-generated data will soon exceed what our networks can handle. But consumers and businesses will expect seamless experiences and real-time responsiveness. What does this mean for IoT devices and the infrastructure that supports them? More of the data will need to be handled at - or closer to - the devices themselves.
SYS-CON Events announced today that Dataloop.IO, an innovator in cloud IT-monitoring whose products help organizations save time and money, has been named “Bronze Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 20th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on June 6-8, 2017, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. Dataloop.IO is an emerging software company on the cutting edge of major IT-infrastructure trends including cloud computing and microservices. The company, founded in the UK but now based in San Fran...
Building a cross-cloud operational model can be a daunting task. Per-cloud silos are not the answer, but neither is a fully generic abstraction plane that strips out capabilities unique to a particular provider. In his session at 20th Cloud Expo, Chris Wolf, VP & Chief Technology Officer, Global Field & Industry at VMware, will discuss how successful organizations approach cloud operations and management, with insights into where operations should be centralized and when it’s best to decentraliz...
In his session at 20th Cloud Expo, Mike Johnston, an infrastructure engineer at Supergiant.io, will discuss how to use Kubernetes to setup a SaaS infrastructure for your business. Mike Johnston is an infrastructure engineer at Supergiant.io with over 12 years of experience designing, deploying, and maintaining server and workstation infrastructure at all scales. He has experience with brick and mortar data centers as well as cloud providers like Digital Ocean, Amazon Web Services, and Rackspace....