Click here to close now.




















Welcome!

SDN Journal Authors: Elizabeth White, Dana Gardner, Chris Janz, Michael Jannery, Lori MacVittie

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Microservices Expo, Containers Expo Blog, Cloud Security, @BigDataExpo, SDN Journal

@CloudExpo: Article

The Intelligence Inside: Cloud Developers Change the World of Analytics

Evidence is mounting that embedding analytics inside apps business people use every day can lead to quantifiable benefits

Slide Deck from Karl Van den Bergh's Cloud Expo Presentation: The Intelligence Inside: How Developers of Cloud Apps Will Change the World of Analytics

We live in a world that requires us to compete on our differential use of time and information, yet only a fraction of information workers today have access to the analytical capabilities they need to make better decisions. Now, with the advent of a new generation of embedded business intelligence (BI) platforms, cloud developers are disrupting the world of analytics. They are using these new BI platforms to inject more intelligence into the applications business people use every day. As a result, data-driven decision-making is finally on track to become the rule, not the exception.

The Increased Focus on Analytics
With the emphasis on data-driven decision-making, it is perhaps not a surprise that the focus on analytics continues to mount. According to IDC's Dan Vesset, 2013 was poised to be the first year that the market for data-driven decision making enabled by business analytics broke through the $100 billion mark. IT executives are also doubling-down on analytics, a fact highlighted by Gartner's annual CIO survey which has put analytics as the number one technology priority three times out of the last five years. So, given the importance and spend on analytics, everyone should have access to the insight they need, right?

Most Business People Still Don't Use Analytics
Amazingly, in spite of spending growth and focus, most information workers today do not have access to business intelligence. In fact, Cindi Howson of BI Scorecard has found that end-user adoption of BI seems to have stagnated at about 25%. This stagnation is difficult to reconcile. How is it possible that, at best, one quarter of information workers have access to what is arguably most critical to their success in a world that runs on data?

There are a variety of reasons for stagnant end-user adoption, including the high costs associated with BI projects and an overall lack of usability. However, the biggest impediment to BI adoption has nothing to do with the technology. The reality is that the vast majority of business decision makers do not spend their day working in a BI tool - nor do they want to. Users already have their preferred tool or application: sales representatives use a CRM service; marketers use a campaign management or marketing automation platform; back-office workers will spend a lot of their day in an ERP application; executives will typically work with their preferred productivity suite, and the list goes on. Unless you are a data analyst, you are not going to want to spend much of your day using a BI tool. But, just because business people prefer not to use a BI tool does not mean they don't want access to pertinent data to bolster better decision-making.

The Need for More Intelligence Inside Applications
What's the solution? Simply put, bring the data TO users inside their preferred applications instead of expecting them to go to a separate BI system to find the report, dashboard or visualization that's relevant to the question at hand. If we want to reach the other 75% of business people who don't have access to a standalone BI product, we have to inject intelligence inside the applications and services they use every day. It is only through more intelligent applications that organizations can benefit from broader data-driven decision-making. In fact, according to Gartner, BI will only become pervasive when it essentially becomes "invisible" to business people as part of the applications they use daily. In a 2013 report highlighting key emerging tech trends, Gartner concludes that in order "to make analytics more actionable and pervasively deployed, BI and analytics professionals must make analytics more invisible and transparent to their users." How? The report explains this will happen "through embedded analytic applications at the point of decision or action."

If the solution to pervasive BI is to deliver greater intelligence inside applications, why don't more applications embed analytics? The reality is that only a small fraction of applications built today have embedded intelligence. Sure, they might have a table or a chart but there is no intelligent engine; users typically can't personalize a report or dashboard or self-serve to generate new visualizations on an ad-hoc basis. The culprit here is that business intelligence was originally intended as a standalone activity, not one that was designed to be embeddable. Specifically, the reasons driving developers to ignore BI platforms boil down to cost and complexity.

Cost and Complexity Are Barriers to Embedded BI
Traditionally, BI tools have carried a user-based licensing model. Licenses typically cost from the tens of thousands to millions of dollars. Such high per-user costs might be justified for a relatively small, predictably-sized population that includes a large percentage of power users who will spend a good amount of time working with the BI tool. This user-based model, however, is totally unsuitable for the embedded use case. The embedded use case is geared toward business users who will access the BI features less frequently and likely have less analytics experience than the traditional power user - in this scenario, high per-user costs simply can't be justified.

BI products are complex on a number of different levels. First, they are complex to deploy, often requiring months if not years to roll out to any reasonable number of users. Second, they are complex to use, both for the developers building the reports and dashboards as well as the business people interacting with the tool. Third, they are complex to embed. Designed as standalone products, BI tools are not architected to plug into another application.

Given the cost and complexity of traditional standalone BI offerings, it is no surprise that developers often turn to charting libraries to deliver the visualizations within their application. The cost is low and they are relatively simple for a developer to embed. In the short term, a charting library is a reasonable solution, but over time falls flat. The demands for more charts, dashboards and reports quickly grow, and end users begin looking for the ability to self-serve and create their own visualizations. As a result of these mounting demands, many application developers find themselves essentially building a BI tool, taking them outside their core competency and stealing precious time away from advancing their own application.

Could a New Generation of Embedded BI Provide the Solution?
Fortunately, there is a new generation of embedded analytic platforms emerging that looks set to address these challenges of cost and complexity. Wayne Eckerson, a noted BI analyst, identifies this as the third generation of embedded analytics in his article on the Evolution of Embedded BI. In summary, Eckerson describes the third generation as "moving beyond the Web to the Cloud" where developers can "rent these Cloud-based BI tools by the hour." These BI platforms can "support a full range of BI functionality including data exploration and authoring" and can be embedded through standard interfaces like REST and JavaScript. So, how does this third-generation address the issues of cost and complexity?

Utility Pricing Dramatically Reduces Cost
To address the challenge of cost, a new generation of embedded analytics platforms employs a utility-based licensing model where the software is available on a per-core, per-hour or per-gigabyte basis. From a developer's perspective, this is a much fairer model, as one only pays for what is used. At the beginning of the application lifecycle when usage is sporadic, developers can limit their costs. As the application becomes successful and use grows, usage can be easily scaled up. A recent report by Nucleus Research concluded that utility pricing for analytics can save organizations up to 70% of what they would pay for a traditional BI solution. I've written previously about how utility pricing will dramatically increase the availability of analytics, reaching a much broader set of organizations. The rapid adoption of Amazon's Redshift data warehousing service and Jaspersoft's reporting and analytics service on the AWS Marketplace provides rich testimony to the benefits of this model.

Cloud and Web-Standard APIs Reduce Complexity
A cloud-based BI platform significantly simplifies deployment, as there is no BI server to install or configure. The Nucleus Research report found that the utility-priced, Cloud BI solutions could be deployed in weeks or even days as opposed to the months commonly required for a traditional BI product.

Leveraging web-standard APIs like REST and JavaScript, the third-generation platforms also simplify the task of embedding analytics both on the front-end and back-end of the application. Importantly, these APIs allow full-featured, self-service BI capabilities to be embedded, not just reports and dashboards. This means increased ability of the application to respond to the ad-hoc information requests of business users.

The Benefits of Embedded Intelligence
Intuitively, it would seem that, by providing analytics within the applications business people use every day, an organization should experience the benefits of more data-driven decision-making. But is there any proof?

A recent report by the Aberdeen Group, based on data from over 130 organizations, has helped shed light on some of the benefits of embedded analytics. First, as might be expected, those companies using embedded analytics saw 76% of users actively engaged in analytics versus only 11% for those with the lowest embedded BI adoption. As a result, 89% of the business people in these best-in-class companies were satisfied with their access to data versus only 21% in the industry laggards. The bottom line? Companies leading embedded BI adoption saw an average 19% increase in operating profit versus only 9% for the other companies.

Andre Gayle, who helps manage a voicemail service at British Telecom, illustrates the difference embedded analytics can make. "We had reports [before] but they had to be emailed to users, who had to wait for them, then dig through them as needed. It was inefficient and wasteful." Now, thanks to embedded analytics, British Telecom has seen a huge savings in time and cost. As Gayle explains, capacity planning for the voicemail service used to be a "laborious exercise, involving several days of effort to dig up the numbers " but now can be done "on demand, in a fact-based manner, in just a few minutes."

The evidence is mounting that embedding analytics inside the applications business people use every day can lead to quantifiable benefits. However, the protagonist here, unlike in the traditional world of analytics, must be the developer, not the analyst. A new generation of embedded BI platforms is making it easier and more cost effective for developers to deliver the analytical capabilities needed inside the Cloud applications they are building. As developers increasingly avail of these new platforms, we can hope that BI will finally become pervasive as an information service that informs day-to-day operations. As Wayne Eckerson puts it, "In many ways, embedded BI represents the fulfillment of BI's promise." Now it's up to Cloud developers to help us realize that promise.

More Stories By Karl Van den Bergh

Karl Van den Bergh is the Vice President of Product Strategy at Jaspersoft, where he is responsible for product strategy, product management and product marketing. Karl is a seasoned high-tech executive with 18 years experience in software, hardware, open source and SaaS businesses, both startup and established.

Prior to Jaspersoft, Karl was the Vice President of Marketing and Alliances at Kickfire, a venture-funded data warehouse appliance startup. He also spent seven years at Business Objects (now part of SAP), where he held progressively senior leadership positions in product marketing, product management, corporate development and strategy – ultimately becoming the General Manager of the Information-On-Demand business. Earlier in his career, he was responsible for EMEA marketing at ASG, one of the world’s largest privately-held software companies. Karl started his career as a software engineer.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


@CloudExpo Stories
SYS-CON Events announced today that HPM Networks will exhibit at the 17th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place on November 3–5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. For 20 years, HPM Networks has been integrating technology solutions that solve complex business challenges. HPM Networks has designed solutions for both SMB and enterprise customers throughout the San Francisco Bay Area.
The Software Defined Data Center (SDDC), which enables organizations to seamlessly run in a hybrid cloud model (public + private cloud), is here to stay. IDC estimates that the software-defined networking market will be valued at $3.7 billion by 2016. Security is a key component and benefit of the SDDC, and offers an opportunity to build security 'from the ground up' and weave it into the environment from day one. In his session at 16th Cloud Expo, Reuven Harrison, CTO and Co-Founder of Tufin,...
With SaaS use rampant across organizations, how can IT departments track company data and maintain security? More and more departments are commissioning their own solutions and bypassing IT. A cloud environment is amorphous and powerful, allowing you to set up solutions for all of your user needs: document sharing and collaboration, mobile access, e-mail, even industry-specific applications. In his session at 16th Cloud Expo, Shawn Mills, President and a founder of Green House Data, discussed h...
Mobile, social, Big Data, and cloud have fundamentally changed the way we live. “Anytime, anywhere” access to data and information is no longer a luxury; it’s a requirement, in both our personal and professional lives. For IT organizations, this means pressure has never been greater to deliver meaningful services to the business and customers.
Container technology is sending shock waves through the world of cloud computing. Heralded as the 'next big thing,' containers provide software owners a consistent way to package their software and dependencies while infrastructure operators benefit from a standard way to deploy and run them. Containers present new challenges for tracking usage due to their dynamic nature. They can also be deployed to bare metal, virtual machines and various cloud platforms. How do software owners track the usag...
The Internet of Everything (IoE) brings together people, process, data and things to make networked connections more relevant and valuable than ever before – transforming information into knowledge and knowledge into wisdom. IoE creates new capabilities, richer experiences, and unprecedented opportunities to improve business and government operations, decision making and mission support capabilities.
Chuck Piluso presented a study of cloud adoption trends and the power and flexibility of IBM Power and Pureflex cloud solutions. Prior to Secure Infrastructure and Services, Mr. Piluso founded North American Telecommunication Corporation, a facilities-based Competitive Local Exchange Carrier licensed by the Public Service Commission in 10 states, serving as the company's chairman and president from 1997 to 2000. Between 1990 and 1997, Mr. Piluso served as chairman & founder of International Te...
There are many considerations when moving applications from on-premise to cloud. It is critical to understand the benefits and also challenges of this migration. A successful migration will result in lower Total Cost of Ownership, yet offer the same or higher level of robustness. In his session at 15th Cloud Expo, Michael Meiner, an Engineering Director at Oracle, Corporation, analyzed a range of cloud offerings (IaaS, PaaS, SaaS) and discussed the benefits/challenges of migrating to each offe...
SYS-CON Events announced today that MobiDev, a software development company, will exhibit at the 17th International Cloud Expo®, which will take place November 3–5, 2015, at the Santa Clara Convention Center in Santa Clara, CA. MobiDev is a software development company with representative offices in Atlanta (US), Sheffield (UK) and Würzburg (Germany); and development centers in Ukraine. Since 2009 it has grown from a small group of passionate engineers and business managers to a full-scale mobi...
One of the hottest areas in cloud right now is DRaaS and related offerings. In his session at 16th Cloud Expo, Dale Levesque, Disaster Recovery Product Manager with Windstream's Cloud and Data Center Marketing team, will discuss the benefits of the cloud model, which far outweigh the traditional approach, and how enterprises need to ensure that their needs are properly being met.
In their session at 17th Cloud Expo, Hal Schwartz, CEO of Secure Infrastructure & Services (SIAS), and Chuck Paolillo, CTO of Secure Infrastructure & Services (SIAS), provide a study of cloud adoption trends and the power and flexibility of IBM Power and Pureflex cloud solutions. In his role as CEO of Secure Infrastructure & Services (SIAS), Hal Schwartz provides leadership and direction for the company.
Explosive growth in connected devices. Enormous amounts of data for collection and analysis. Critical use of data for split-second decision making and actionable information. All three are factors in making the Internet of Things a reality. Yet, any one factor would have an IT organization pondering its infrastructure strategy. How should your organization enhance its IT framework to enable an Internet of Things implementation? In his session at @ThingsExpo, James Kirkland, Red Hat's Chief Arch...
Malicious agents are moving faster than the speed of business. Even more worrisome, most companies are relying on legacy approaches to security that are no longer capable of meeting current threats. In the modern cloud, threat diversity is rapidly expanding, necessitating more sophisticated security protocols than those used in the past or in desktop environments. Yet companies are falling for cloud security myths that were truths at one time but have evolved out of existence.
Digital Transformation is the ultimate goal of cloud computing and related initiatives. The phrase is certainly not a precise one, and as subject to hand-waving and distortion as any high-falutin' terminology in the world of information technology. Yet it is an excellent choice of words to describe what enterprise IT—and by extension, organizations in general—should be working to achieve. Digital Transformation means: handling all the data types being found and created in the organizat...
Public Cloud IaaS started its life in the developer and startup communities and has grown rapidly to a $20B+ industry, but it still pales in comparison to how much is spent worldwide on IT: $3.6 trillion. In fact, there are 8.6 million data centers worldwide, the reality is many small and medium sized business have server closets and colocation footprints filled with servers and storage gear. While on-premise environment virtualization may have peaked at 75%, the Public Cloud has lagged in adop...
The time is ripe for high speed resilient software defined storage solutions with unlimited scalability. ISS has been working with the leading open source projects and developed a commercial high performance solution that is able to grow forever without performance limitations. In his session at Cloud Expo, Alex Gorbachev, President of Intelligent Systems Services Inc., shared foundation principles of Ceph architecture, as well as the design to deliver this storage to traditional SAN storage co...
MuleSoft has announced the findings of its 2015 Connectivity Benchmark Report on the adoption and business impact of APIs. The findings suggest traditional businesses are quickly evolving into "composable enterprises" built out of hundreds of connected software services, applications and devices. Most are embracing the Internet of Things (IoT) and microservices technologies like Docker. A majority are integrating wearables, like smart watches, and more than half plan to generate revenue with ...
The Cloud industry has moved from being more than just being able to provide infrastructure and management services on the Cloud. Enter a new era of Cloud computing where monetization’s services through the Cloud are an essential piece of strategy to feed your organizations bottom-line, your revenue and Profitability. In their session at 16th Cloud Expo, Ermanno Bonifazi, CEO & Founder of Solgenia, and Ian Khan, Global Strategic Positioning & Brand Manager at Solgenia, discussed how to easily o...
Growth hacking is common for startups to make unheard-of progress in building their business. Career Hacks can help Geek Girls and those who support them (yes, that's you too, Dad!) to excel in this typically male-dominated world. Get ready to learn the facts: Is there a bias against women in the tech / developer communities? Why are women 50% of the workforce, but hold only 24% of the STEM or IT positions? Some beginnings of what to do about it! In her Opening Keynote at 16th Cloud Expo, S...
The speed of software changes in growing and large scale rapid-paced DevOps environments presents a challenge for continuous testing. Many organizations struggle to get this right. Practices that work for small scale continuous testing may not be sufficient as the requirements grow. In his session at DevOps Summit, Marc Hornbeek, Sr. Solutions Architect of DevOps continuous test solutions at Spirent Communications, explained the best practices of continuous testing at high scale, which is rele...