Welcome!

SDN Journal Authors: Liz McMillan, Yeshim Deniz, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, TJ Randall

Related Topics: @DXWorldExpo, Microservices Expo, Containers Expo Blog, @CloudExpo, Apache, SDN Journal

@DXWorldExpo: Article

Big Data Good, Fast Big Data Better

Speed has become an integral part of the Big Data ethos, yet it is mentioned with comparative scarcity

This post is sponsored by The Business Value Exchange and HP Enterprise Services

The IT industry is nothing if not a breeding ground for an infinite variety of acronyms and neologisms. Alongside cloud computing today sits the term Big Data, which of course we understand to mean "that amount" of data which a traditional database would find hard to compute and process as a normal matter of job processing.

Neo-neologisms
But what is a neologism if you can't turn it into a neo-neologism? Big Data in its own right is a term that we are just about getting used to, but the sooner we move towards an appreciation of ‘fast Big Data' the better.

Technology analysts have been fond of the standard 'four Vs' definition used to describe the shape of Big Data, i.e., volume, velocity, variety and variability - but it is the ‘velocity' factor that sits somewhat incongruently among its V-shaped bedfellows, i.e., it is the only factor that describes speed or motion. Without a velocity layer, Big Data lies in a state of inertia.

In the new world of data 2.0 we find that the velocity factor is extremely important. More of our computing channels are described as real-time or near real-time (both definitions are important) as users demand applications that rely upon ubiquitous connections to the Internet, other users, other data events and other application services.

Suddenly speed has become an integral part of the Big Data ethos, yet it is mentioned with comparative scarcity. Press and analyst (and vendor) comment pieces talk up the zany incomprehensible world of zettabytes, petabytes and yottabytes. These are low hanging fruit and easy to comment on. Forget terabytes, they are so 2009.

Speed Is the Unloved Second Cousin of Big Data
If speed is the unloved second cousin of Big Data, it shouldn't be. Major enterprise players (the vendors, not the customers in the first instance) are spending their hard-earned acquisition and development dollars on the technology positioned as the antidote to our Big Data woes, namely "analytics" - and analytics without real-time analytics is like a car at full throttle without a steering wheel, i.e., we need to be able to react to data in the real world and navigate through it without crashing.

Of course the real fact of the matter here is that Big Data should be considered for its size, girth and overall hugeness as much as for its speed of movement. To contemplate an analysis of one without the other is fallacious and foolhardy. These two factors form two mutually interdependent sides of the contemporary data balancing equation that props up the Big Data economic model.

Software requirements in terms of compute capacity and depth of storage (okay that's hardware, we know) both increase proportionally as the economic values for data and time approach zero. As fast real time Big Data comes of age, we need more back office technology to support it.

None of this happens without layers of management technology and this is where much of the industry discussion is focused today with regard to Big Data. The trouble is, people aren't calling it fast Big Data yet. It will happen, but it needs to happen in real time and that means today.

More Stories By Adrian Bridgwater

Adrian Bridgwater is a freelance journalist and corporate content creation specialist focusing on cross platform software application development as well as all related aspects software engineering, project management and technology as a whole.

Comments (0)

Share your thoughts on this story.

Add your comment
You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


CloudEXPO Stories
Nutanix has been named "Platinum Sponsor" of CloudEXPO | DevOpsSUMMIT | DXWorldEXPO New York, which will take place November 12-13, 2018 in New York City. Nutanix makes infrastructure invisible, elevating IT to focus on the applications and services that power their business. The Nutanix Enterprise Cloud Platform blends web-scale engineering and consumer-grade design to natively converge server, storage, virtualization and networking into a resilient, software-defined solution with rich machine intelligence.
Intel is an American multinational corporation and technology company headquartered in Santa Clara, California, in the Silicon Valley. It is the world's second largest and second highest valued semiconductor chip maker based on revenue after being overtaken by Samsung, and is the inventor of the x86 series of microprocessors, the processors found in most personal computers (PCs). Intel supplies processors for computer system manufacturers such as Apple, Lenovo, HP, and Dell. Intel also manufactures motherboard chipsets, network interface controllers and integrated circuits, flash memory, graphics chips, embedded processors and other devices related to communications and computing.
Digital transformation is about embracing digital technologies into a company's culture to better connect with its customers, automate processes, create better tools, enter new markets, etc. Such a transformation requires continuous orchestration across teams and an environment based on open collaboration and daily experiments. In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, Alex Casalboni, Technical (Cloud) Evangelist at Cloud Academy, explored and discussed the most urgent unsolved challenges to achieve full cloud literacy in the enterprise world.
Wasabi is the hot cloud storage company delivering low-cost, fast, and reliable cloud storage. Wasabi is 80% cheaper and 6x faster than Amazon S3, with 100% data immutability protection and no data egress fees. Created by Carbonite co-founders and cloud storage pioneers David Friend and Jeff Flowers, Wasabi is on a mission to commoditize the storage industry. Wasabi is a privately held company based in Boston, MA. Follow and connect with Wasabi on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and the Wasabi blog.
Digital Transformation and Disruption, Amazon Style - What You Can Learn. Chris Kocher is a co-founder of Grey Heron, a management and strategic marketing consulting firm. He has 25+ years in both strategic and hands-on operating experience helping executives and investors build revenues and shareholder value. He has consulted with over 130 companies on innovating with new business models, product strategies and monetization. Chris has held management positions at HP and Symantec in addition to advisory roles at startups. He has worked extensively on monetization, SAAS, IoT, ecosystems, partnerships and accelerating growth in new business initiatives.