Welcome!

SDN Journal Authors: Yeshim Deniz, Liz McMillan, Elizabeth White, Pat Romanski, TJ Randall

Related Topics: @DXWorldExpo, Open Source Cloud, Containers Expo Blog, @CloudExpo, Apache, SDN Journal

@DXWorldExpo: Article

Hadoop and Big Data Easily Understood - How to Conduct a Census of a City

What is Hadoop, what is Map Reduce and what is Big Data - how to count the residents of San Francisco, Los Angeles or a village.

BigData (and Hadoop) are buzzword and growth areas of computing; this article will distill the concepts into easy-to-understand terms.

As the name implies, BigData is literally "big data" or "lots of data" that needs to be processed. Lets take a simple example: the city council of San Francisco is required to take a census of its population - literally how many people live at each address. There are city employees who are employed to count the residents. The city of Los Angeles has a similar requirement.

Consider are two methods to accomplish this task:

1. Request all the San Francisco residents to line up at City Hall and be prcessed by the city employees. Of course, this is very cumbersome and time consuming because the people are brought to the city hall and processed one by one - in scientific terms the data are transfered to the processing node. The people have to wait in line for a long time, the processing time is lengthy as the employees do down the line counting and processing the residents: "How many people live at your address?" In scientific terms, the data is processed serially, one after the next; then the data is aggregated at the end of the processing phase.

2. Send census forms to each address and request the residents to complete the form on a specific date and return to city hall for aggregation. In scientific terms the data is processed at the data node (resident's address) in parallel (all forms completed simultaneously by residents on a target date) and then aggregated at the processing node (city hall).

These two phases: process and aggregate are known in the Big Data community as "Map Reduce" - phase one map the data; phase two reduce the data to aggregate totals.

So far so good.

How do we process large amounts of data, in parallel, very quickly using computers?

An open source project, licensed under Apache, known as Hadoop, grew out of research from Yahoo and Google. Hadoop performs the MapReduce function on a distributed file system known as HDFS (Hadoop Distributed File System). Why is the file system distributed ? Remember, the Map Reduce function performs the phase one processing of data at the data node (the census form is completed at the resident's address). It is too time consuming to copy the data to a central processing node (request all the residents to line up at city hall). Thus Hadoop uses a distributed file system, so that the processing takes place on many distributed servers at once (in parallel). Because Hadoop is distributing the processing task, it can take advantage of cheap commodity hardware - compare this to processing all the data centrally on big expensive hardware.

The advantage of cheap commodity hardware is you only need to use as many servers as needed. To use the census analogy - how many computers would Hadoop require to process the census forms of San Francisco (four square miles) compared to Los Angeles (400+ square miles) ? If the census bureau buys one very large computer, the computer would be able to process the data for Los Angeles, but most of the compute power (and electricity) used by the computer would be wasted when the computer processed the census data for San Francisco. So the census bureau can rent say four computers to process the San Francisco data, and then rent perhaps another 90 to process the census data for Los Angeles. It is cheaper to rent commodity physical hardware and the Hadoop task is also an opportunity to use an elastic cloud computing environment where compute power is used on demand.

More Stories By Jonathan Gershater

Jonathan Gershater has lived and worked in Silicon Valley since 1996, primarily doing system and sales engineering specializing in: Web Applications, Identity and Security. At Red Hat, he provides Technical Marketing for Virtualization and Cloud. Prior to joining Red Hat, Jonathan worked at 3Com, Entrust (by acquisition) two startups, Sun Microsystems and Trend Micro.

(The views expressed in this blog are entirely mine and do not represent my employer - Jonathan).

CloudEXPO Stories
In his session at 20th Cloud Expo, Mike Johnston, an infrastructure engineer at Supergiant.io, discussed how to use Kubernetes to set up a SaaS infrastructure for your business. Mike Johnston is an infrastructure engineer at Supergiant.io with over 12 years of experience designing, deploying, and maintaining server and workstation infrastructure at all scales. He has experience with brick and mortar data centers as well as cloud providers like Digital Ocean, Amazon Web Services, and Rackspace. His expertise is in automating deployment, management, and problem resolution in these environments, allowing his teams to run large transactional applications with high availability and the speed the consumer demands.
The technologies behind big data and cloud computing are converging quickly, offering businesses new capabilities for fast, easy, wide-ranging access to data. However, to capitalize on the cost-efficiencies and time-to-value opportunities of analytics in the cloud, big data and cloud technologies must be integrated and managed properly. Pythian's Director of Big Data and Data Science, Danil Zburivsky will explore: The main technology components and best practices being deployed to take advantage of data and analytics in the cloud, Architecture, integration, governance and security scenarios and Key challenges and success factors of moving data and analytics to the cloud
SYS-CON Events announced today that DatacenterDynamics has been named “Media Sponsor” of SYS-CON's 18th International Cloud Expo, which will take place on June 7–9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY. DatacenterDynamics is a brand of DCD Group, a global B2B media and publishing company that develops products to help senior professionals in the world's most ICT dependent organizations make risk-based infrastructure and capacity decisions.
Most DevOps journeys involve several phases of maturity. Research shows that the inflection point where organizations begin to see maximum value is when they implement tight integration deploying their code to their infrastructure. Success at this level is the last barrier to at-will deployment. Storage, for instance, is more capable than where we read and write data. In his session at @DevOpsSummit at 20th Cloud Expo, Josh Atwell, a Developer Advocate for NetApp, will discuss the role and value extensible storage infrastructure has in accelerating software development activities, improve code quality, reveal multiple deployment options through automated testing, and support continuous integration efforts. All this will be described using tools common in DevOps organizations.
"When you think about the data center today, there's constant evolution, The evolution of the data center and the needs of the consumer of technology change, and they change constantly," stated Matt Kalmenson, VP of Sales, Service and Cloud Providers at Veeam Software, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 18th Cloud Expo, held June 7-9, 2016, at the Javits Center in New York City, NY.