Welcome!

SDN Journal Authors: Elizabeth White, Yeshim Deniz, Liz McMillan, Pat Romanski, TJ Randall

Related Topics: @CloudExpo, Java IoT, Microservices Expo, Containers Expo Blog, SDN Journal

@CloudExpo: Blog Feed Post

Houston, We Have Cloud

The data centers of the future may look more like NASA ground control – governance inside, resources out

The data centers of the future may look more like NASA ground control – governance inside, resources out

One theme has remained consistent throughout the evolution of cloud thus far - enterprise IT wants to retain control of both its data and access to to it.

This is not an unreasonable demand. After all, it is enterprise IT - and its leadership - that will pay the price should customer data leak or regulations not complied with. Despite the growing view that cloud security is a joint, shared responsibility between customer and provider, it is enterprise IT that must put into place the mechanisms for both controlling and proving control over data and access, not cloud providers or integrators. The provider can offer services designed to provide that control, but it is not the one that must implement the polices or report on their effectiveness.

Amazon throws down the gauntlet for enterprise IT

While a collaboration and file-sharing app has been moved to AWS, access controls have to remain in-house, according to Oliver Alvarez, lead enterprise security architect for the World Bank's International Finance Corporation.

"We need to maintain control and custodianship of information," he said.

Access control by its nature must include identity management. Without the means to manage the credentials and map authorization of access to data and services to those credentials, control is lost. If customer data is the lifeblood of an organization, identity stores are the heart's valves, controlling when and where that data is moved and by whom.

TWO EMERGING ARCHITECTURES

Two architectures for control over identity and access are beginning to emerge, both having a common premise - identity stores are local, data and services are remote. In one architecture a provider - usually of a SaaS solution - deploys a virtual appliance on premise that brokers identity. This essentially enables LDAP/AD integration between the data center and the SaaS. In the second, a strategic control layer acting as a cloud services broker provides integration between environments using standard protocols, such as SAML, to enable control over authentication and authorization of cloud services.

The appliance model is an extension of agent-based services, merely expanded to the data center level. There are some concerns that go along with this model, chiefly that an external entity has control of an agent within the data center but in general this models appears to enjoy market acceptance, especially in cases where a standards-based approach is unavailable.

The alternative, standards-based model, uses the same brokering model but the broker is under the control of enterprise IT, not the provider. It relies on the same principles of abstraction we've come to recognize with virtualization and SDN as being beneficial to agility in the network and data center, putting a layer of control between resources and users so as to enable more flexibility in not just access control and identity management but in making routing decisions with respect to those resources.

That layer of control within enterprise IT is unlikely to go away for the very reasons cited above: control (governance) is a legal and operational necessity for enterprise IT. Cloud providers who fail to recognize this need and move to provide services supportive of that necessity are merely shooting themselves in the foot with respect to gaining more traction with enterprise customers.

Cloud gateways and broker services are going to end up enabling this architecture on the enterprise side. It is in providers' best interests to make these architectures as painless to implement as possible.

Read the original blog entry...

More Stories By Lori MacVittie

Lori MacVittie is responsible for education and evangelism of application services available across F5’s entire product suite. Her role includes authorship of technical materials and participation in a number of community-based forums and industry standards organizations, among other efforts. MacVittie has extensive programming experience as an application architect, as well as network and systems development and administration expertise. Prior to joining F5, MacVittie was an award-winning Senior Technology Editor at Network Computing Magazine, where she conducted product research and evaluation focused on integration with application and network architectures, and authored articles on a variety of topics aimed at IT professionals. Her most recent area of focus included SOA-related products and architectures. She holds a B.S. in Information and Computing Science from the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay, and an M.S. in Computer Science from Nova Southeastern University.

CloudEXPO Stories
When talking IoT we often focus on the devices, the sensors, the hardware itself. The new smart appliances, the new smart or self-driving cars (which are amalgamations of many ‘things'). When we are looking at the world of IoT, we should take a step back, look at the big picture. What value are these devices providing. IoT is not about the devices, its about the data consumed and generated. The devices are tools, mechanisms, conduits. This paper discusses the considerations when dealing with the massive amount of information associated with these devices. Ed presented sought out sessions at CloudEXPO Silicon Valley 2017 and CloudEXPO New York 2017. He is a regular contributor to Cloud Computing Journal.
Charles Araujo is an industry analyst, internationally recognized authority on the Digital Enterprise and author of The Quantum Age of IT: Why Everything You Know About IT is About to Change. As Principal Analyst with Intellyx, he writes, speaks and advises organizations on how to navigate through this time of disruption. He is also the founder of The Institute for Digital Transformation and a sought after keynote speaker. He has been a regular contributor to both InformationWeek and CIO Insight and has been quoted or published in Time, CIO, Computerworld, USA Today and Forbes.
DXWorldEXPO LLC announced today that Kevin Jackson joined the faculty of CloudEXPO's "10-Year Anniversary Event" which will take place on November 11-13, 2018 in New York City. Kevin L. Jackson is a globally recognized cloud computing expert and Founder/Author of the award winning "Cloud Musings" blog. Mr. Jackson has also been recognized as a "Top 100 Cybersecurity Influencer and Brand" by Onalytica (2015), a Huffington Post "Top 100 Cloud Computing Experts on Twitter" (2013) and a "Top 50 Cloud Computing Blogger for IT Integrators" by CRN (2015). Mr. Jackson's professional career includes service in the US Navy Space Systems Command, Vice President J.P. Morgan Chase, Worldwide Sales Executive for IBM and NJVC Vice President, Cloud Services. He is currently part of a team responsible for onboarding mission applications to the US Intelligence Community cloud computing environment (IC ...
Sanjeev Sharma Joins November 11-13, 2018 @DevOpsSummit at @CloudEXPO New York Faculty. Sanjeev Sharma is an internationally known DevOps and Cloud Transformation thought leader, technology executive, and author. Sanjeev's industry experience includes tenures as CTO, Technical Sales leader, and Cloud Architect leader. As an IBM Distinguished Engineer, Sanjeev is recognized at the highest levels of IBM's core of technical leaders.
For years the world's most security-focused and distributed organizations - banks, military/defense agencies, global enterprises - have sought to adopt cloud technologies that can reduce costs, future-proof against data growth, and improve user productivity. The challenges of cloud transformation for these kinds of secure organizations have centered around data security, migration from legacy systems, and performance. In our presentation, we will discuss the notion that cloud computing, properly managed, is poised to bring about a digital transformation to enterprise IT. We will discuss the trend, the technology and the timeline for adoption.